Outline of the Discussion
  • A Biblical worldview can set us up for being more open to conspiracy theories than we might otherwise be.
    • Further exacerbating a proclivity toward conspiracy theories is that a Biblical eschatology tells us what to expect for the future, but human nature causes us to fill in the gaps on how that future will come about.
    • Not knowing is frustrating, and causes us to look for answers and explanations. Steve uses a medical issue to explain.
  • Conspiracy theories are a political version of gnosticism. People who push conspiracy theories claim a special (secret) knowledge.
  • Another driver is fear and anxiety. It’s always wise to check ourselves for fear. Fear is the opposite of faith.
  • There have been more prominent conspiracy theories lately that are more “good guy” conspiracies, saying that there are people working behind the scenes to help us. This has dangers that many people fail to see. For one, they cause us to let our guard down and put an unhealthy trust in unseen and unknown people and forces.
  • It’s not necessarily a bad thing to hear out various views, but it’s important to draw a line and let it go when the line is crossed. When the facts don’t bear out as the view or theory would suggest.
  • Simply acknowledging the existence of evil starts to open us up to various conspiracy theories.
  • Scripture will renew our minds and focus our attention where it needs to be.
  • Understanding the Gospel is not the shallow end of the theological pool. It’s the whole pool.
  • The area of health and medicine is one where conspiracy theories are prevalent.
  • Become generally aware of the overall strategies of the Devil, not intricately familiar with the details of his ways.
  • The Lord will deal with evil.
  • Providence watches over us!
Scriptures Referenced
  • Matthew 24:4
  • Colossians 4:5
  • Romans 12:2
  • Ephesians 5:8
  • Matthew 10:16
  • 1 Corinthians 14:20
  • Proverbs 3:5
  • Esther 4:14
  • Acts 20:22-23